Tag Archives: cricket journalism

Journo Talk 6: ‘Maybe George Orwell was right!’

by Sam Blackledge

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Cricket journalism, despite what the BCCI might have us believe, is no longer simply confined to newsprint.

Barely 20 years ago, a report in the morning paper and a flick through Ceefax was the only way to find out what was going on.

Now there is so much content pouring from various new media platforms, it’s difficult to keep track.

At the forefront of this revolution is a growing community of cricket bloggers.

They might not have mastheads over their names or a 30-year playing career behind them, but some believe they are becoming just as influential as their cohorts in the press box.

Dan Whiting and Liam Kenna founded The Middle Stump four years ago, attracting almost 750,000 hits and a loyal worldwide following.

The site is bolshy, irreverent, goofy and not afraid to speak its mind.

Where else would you find a rude joke about Lenny Henry sandwiched between references to Hawaii Five-O and Sooty and Sweep? Certainly not in The Daily Telegraph.

Dan, who lives in North London, played club cricket for more than 30 years and started blogging as an idle hobby.

 I have tried to write from a different angle, and people seem to enjoy reading about the game while having a bit of fun at the same time,” he says.

“I don’t want to write standard match reports; I wanted to write about the game in a way that no-one else does, and that seems to resonate.

“The stuff I write is original – whether that is good or bad – but I haven’t plagiarised or borrowed ideas from other blogs. Not all writers can say that.”

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Dan believes the decline of cricket in mainstream print has left a gap in the market.

“The desire from the public is out there, and if they aren’t getting their cricketing fix via the national press then bloggers can fill it,” he says.

The blog led to work with The Cricket Paper, where Dan recently completed an 18-part feature on county out grounds.

Has he learned to adjust his writing style for his new bosses?

“Massively!” he says.

“Carter-Ruck, Schillings and all the libel lawyers in the country would be involved if I wrote the same way.

“You can still write differently for proper work – just maybe cut out the swear words.”

Back in September Dan penned a furious open letter to the ECB, saying their decision to pursue a city-based T20 tournament was “the day English cricket sold its soul to television”.

Looking back, he has no regrets.

“Too many mainstream publication pieces are factual and there are not enough opinion-based pieces out there,” he says.

“Blogging does give you the freedom to do that. I had some feedback from people ‘within cricket’ who loved the piece but couldn’t publicly say.

“Are journalists scared of losing their accreditation with the ECB by saying the wrong thing these days? If so, we are living in sad times. Perhaps George Orwell was right!”

In April 2013 Dan and Liam published a book called ‘Cricket Banter’.

I received it as a Christmas stocking filler the following year, but it soon found its way to the charity shop.

I felt the book was trying to turn my beloved game – a strange, thoughtful, nerdy pastime – into a laddish playground knockabout.

“You’re not the only one to say that,” he says.

“It’s like music – some people like indie, some house, some classical.

“Likewise, some people loved the book and others hated it. Jonathan Liew panned it in The Telegraph, although it did wonders for sales.

“As for being laddish, well I enjoy a beer at the cricket and writing from that angle. I hope I didn’t ruin your Christmas though!”

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Dan recently released a self-penned book, ‘The Definitive Guide to Club Cricket’, which seems to be much more heartfelt and based on his own experience.

He describes it as “an anthropological study of club cricketers”, with a foreword written by Yorkshire seamer Jack Brooks.

“Every club has a weird scorer, a beleaguered skipper struggling to find players on a Saturday morning, a boring AGM, a bent umpire, so clubs identify with the characters involved,” he says.

“There are some serious articles in there too, such as Sunday cricket slowly dying and money coming into the game at club level.”

What advice would Dan offer to other would-be bloggers hoping to break into his world?

“Be yourself, be original and be interesting,” he says.

“No one cares what you think really, so make them sit up and take notice.”

 

Journo Talk is taking a break while it goes on paternity leave, but will be back in 2017.

Are you a cricket journalist? Would you like to be featured?

E-mail samblackledge@yahoo.com or tweet @samblackledge

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Complaining about selection is one of the joys of being a cricket fan

by Sam Blackledge

 

After England’s defeat to Bangladesh at Dhaka, fans were quick to voice their dismay at the balance of the team.

Some might say we should give the selectors a break. They’re trying their best to cope with a ridiculous international schedule, and they are a darn sight more qualified than the rest of us.

It’s the easiest thing in the world to sit on our sofas moaning that the likes of Ansari, Ballance and Rashid are not cut out for Test cricket, as if we have been anywhere near that level ourselves.

But then again, complaining about selection policy is one of the great joys of being a cricket fan.

Perhaps it’s a peculiarly English thing, like queuing, talking about the weather, or existential self-loathing. Or maybe cricket fans worldwide think they could do a better job with a scrap of paper and numbers 1 to 11 left blank.

It’s why the fantasy football industry is still thriving, and it’s a major reason why we all still love sport. The feeling that if only those in charge would ask us, we could sort it out.

 

The comedian Dylan Moran put it best.

He said: “Look at the people who give it everything. The Beckhams or Roy Keanes of this world. Running up and down the field, swearing and shouting at each other.

“Are they happy? No! They’re destroying themselves. Who’s happy? You. The fat f**ks watching them, with a beer can balanced on your ninth belly, roaring advice at the best athletes in the world.”

Social media, of course, has made all of this so much more visible.

When 43-year-old John Emburey was recalled to the England Test team in 1995, I have a vivid memory of seeing the news on Teletext, turning to my dad and simply saying: “Emburey?”

If that happened now, I probably wouldn’t even turn around. I would reach for my phone and spew my thoughts straight on to Twitter, and they would immediately be buried under the thousands of others doing the exact same thing.

The selectorial merry-go-round is sure to be in full flow as England kick off against India on Wednesday.

Nobody seems to know whether we stand a chance against the might of Kohli, Ashwin and the rest.

But one thing is for sure: if we couldn’t complain, we wouldn’t be half as interested.

This piece first appeared at Last Word On Cricket

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Journo Talk 3: ‘Some might say I’m bolshy – I call it passionate’

By Sam Blackledge

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“I wish we didn’t have to do the woman thing.”

Lizzie Ammon, speaking to her 29,000 Twitter followers, has pre-empted my question.

A freelance writer and broadcaster for The Times, the BBC and The Guardian among many others, Ammon is far from your typical cricket journalist.

The “woman thing” is impossible to escape, so let’s get it out of the way.

“I guess while women are the minority in sports journalism it’s going to be a thing if you are one,” she says.

“I’m a single mum and I won’t pretend doing this job and trying to look after a small child is easy, it isn’t.

“It requires having a very understanding childminder, being completely organised in terms of logistics and being able to cope with the guilt of not seeing your child much.

“But I am quite passionate about demonstrating that you can be a mum and a sports journalist, even though the hours are a bit erratic and sometimes long, particularly in cricket.”

Ammon says she “fell into” the job, having followed the game from a young age as scorer, junior coach and county member.

She blogged and got the occasional gig with a newspaper “more by luck than judgement”, but says being in the right place at the right time is just the start.

“There are hundreds and hundreds of people who want to write about sport for a living,” she says.

“You can’t expect a sports editor to employ you to just sit all day watching cricket in the sunshine and filing 500 words on what happened.

“You have to give them something they can’t get from Press Association reports or from any other writer.”

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We move on to the subject of social media.

My own day job requires me to follow a stream of chattering political types, clogging up my feed with endless squabbles over Brexit, Corbyn, Trident and the rest.

With 230,000 tweets and counting, ‘LegSideLizzy’ gives them all a run for their money.

Her messages appear as a stream-of-consciousness: one minute she’s sniping at ECB bosses and the lunacy of international schedules, the next she’s gleefully tweeting along with Cold Feet and posting pictures of her sausage casserole.

“I know a lot of my colleagues hate it,” she says. “I have a love-hate relationship with it but I am very active.

“It’s a useful tool for spotting trends, opinions and news; it’s also a great way of engaging with everyone, from county chairman to county members or a player’s best mate.

“I try to use it to both impart what I know and give my opinions. I’m afraid I have had some horrible experiences on Twitter – everything from rape threats to personal abuse about my looks.

“It kind of goes with the territory, and on balance I think it’s far better to be on social media than not, particularly if you are trying to build an audience and get noticed.

“Sometimes I get told I am too much of a self-publicist, but I figure if you want to try to pursue a career sometimes you have to self-publicise.”

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Does her online identity reflect who she is in real life?

“I’m probably not the best judge of that,” she says.

“I am outspoken, perhaps far too outspoken at times. Some might call it bolshy and opinionated; some might call it passionate.

“I am certainly passionate about cricket, particularly the less than glamorous world of county cricket.

“Some of that is because you form genuine affinities with the players, coaches and supporters in county cricket.

“It’s not like football, it’s a small enough to really feel like it’s something worth fighting for.”

Ammon has built an enviable portfolio of scoops, including digging into the fallout from the ECB’s decision to relegate Durham from division one of the County Championship.

She says newsgathering is “the only thing I am any good at”.

“I am self-aware enough to know that I am no Michael Atherton or Gideon Haigh.

“I don’t write pretty words or have a nice turn of phrase and I’m not a technical expert. Inherently I am a massive gossip, which isn’t a bad trait for a journalist.

“I like finding things out, pursuing things to their end. I believe one of the most important roles of a journalist is to hold authority to account for every decision they make, to uncover things, and most importantly to tell your reader something they didn’t already know and couldn’t find out somewhere else.”

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Given she has not come from within the game, like many cricket writers, does she feel more able to challenge those at the top?

“I am not scared of authority, although of course if you annoy powerful men they can make life very uncomfortable for you,” she says.

“I guess in a sense I don’t have anything to lose by challenging authority, but at the risk of sounding pious, it isn’t solely about that.

“I try to find out the truth and write about it, and if some of those truths make life uncomfortable for those in power then that is not really my problem.

“The current ECB administration often verges close to bullying territory and that gets my back up, so I will continue to stay across what some see as the minutiae of county cricket and continue to try to hold the ECB to account for the decisions they are taking.

“I do try to give credit where it is due too, although perhaps not as often as I should.

“But no-one wants to read ‘Isn’t everything great and didn’t they all do well’. That doesn’t sell newspapers.”

Are you a proper cricket journalist? Would you like to feature in Journo Talk? E-mail samblackledge@yahoo.com or tweet @samblackledge.

 

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